Got industry experience?

Often I find myself just sitting around thinking.  The other day I started searching several online job posting websites.  I was wondering if other disciplines require  knowledge  of the core business.  In my quest to figure this out I reviewed over 500 job postings for a variety of different technical disciplines including mechanical engineer, electrical engineer, chemist, and biologist.  In each case, over 90 percent of the job postings required industry domain expertise.   For example, a job posting for a mechanical engineer required 11-14 years of experience in production packaging of electronic equipment.   The same was true for chemist and nearly all chemist jobs required domain experience or knowledge of the core business.

Let me stop and review.   If you are a chemist then your future employer wants you to know about chemistry and the industry (core business).  The same is true if you are a mechanical engineer or electrical engineer.

This is in sharp contrast to software development.  When I examined job posting after job posting, almost none required any knowledge about the core business.   Out of 100 job postings for software developers that I  reviewed only 4 required industry domain knowledge.   Think about this for a second.   Poor  requirements plague the software industry.  Do ya think it has anything to do with the fact most software developers have no knowledge of the core business?  Come on folks!

One could argue that it is better to be a generalist instead of a specialist, but no other industry suffers as many project failures has software development.  No other industry frustrates end users like the software industry.  No other industry has such a problem with requirements as the software industry.

Read more at Reboot! Rethinking and Restarting Software Development

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. This is one of the reasons why in the last 15 years we’ve seen an explosion of organizations that certify IT profession experience… you have:

    opengroup’s ITAC for IT architects
    theIIBA.org for IT business analysts
    pmi.org PMP for IT project managers
    SEI’s PSP for developers
    ISACA CISA for IT security and audit
    and keep going and going for vendor products, etc.

    Two sided problem… 1) certification no longer “gives you a job” amd 2) certification doesn’t prove competency (in IT.) The analogy; these organizations are much like self help products. Someone is making money of lectures, test, books, and subscriptions… but the end product for the client is pretty much a piece of paper (that anyone could get if they paid for it.)

  2. http://www.informit.com/articles/article.aspx?p=1180991

    Top ten reasons certs fail.


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